Comparison of Measures of Variability of Speech Movement Trajectories Using Synthetic Records In speech research, it is often desirable to assess quantitatively the variability of a set of speech movement trajectories. This problem is studied here using synthetic trajectories, which consist of a common pattern and terms representing amplitude and phase variability. The results show that a technique for temporal alignment of ... Research Note
Research Note  |   April 01, 2005
Comparison of Measures of Variability of Speech Movement Trajectories Using Synthetic Records
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jorge C. Lucero
    University of Brasilia, Brazil
  • Contact author: Jorge C. Lucero, Department of Mathematics, University of Brasilia, Brasilia, DF 70910-900, Brazil. E-mail: lucero@mat.unb.br
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   April 01, 2005
Comparison of Measures of Variability of Speech Movement Trajectories Using Synthetic Records
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2005, Vol. 48, 336-344. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/023)
History: Received May 10, 2004 , Accepted August 17, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2005, Vol. 48, 336-344. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/023)
History: Received May 10, 2004; Accepted August 17, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

In speech research, it is often desirable to assess quantitatively the variability of a set of speech movement trajectories. This problem is studied here using synthetic trajectories, which consist of a common pattern and terms representing amplitude and phase variability. The results show that a technique for temporal alignment of the records based on functional data analysis allows us to extract the pattern and variability terms as separate functions, with good approximation. Indices of amplitude and phase variability are defined, which provide a more accurate assessment of variability than previous approaches.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico (Brazil). The results reported here were presented in partial form at the 5th Seminar on Speech Production, in Kloster Seeon, Germany, May 2000. I am grateful to Dr. Kevin G. Munhall and Dr. Vincent L. Gracco for their interest and useful discussions on this research.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access