Relationships Between Nonword Repetition Accuracy and Other Measures of Linguistic Development in Children With Phonological Disorders A growing body of research has documented effects of phonotactic probability on young children's nonword repetition. This study extends this research in 2 ways. First, it compares nonword repetitions by 40 young children with phonological disorders with those by 40 same-age peers with typical phonological development on a nonword repetition ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2005
Relationships Between Nonword Repetition Accuracy and Other Measures of Linguistic Development in Children With Phonological Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Benjamin Munson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Jan Edwards
    Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Mary E. Beckman
    Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Contact author: Benjamin Munson, PhD, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
    Contact author: Benjamin Munson, PhD, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: Munso005@umn.edu
  • Laurence Leonard served as a guest associate editor on this article.
    Laurence Leonard served as a guest associate editor on this article.×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2005
Relationships Between Nonword Repetition Accuracy and Other Measures of Linguistic Development in Children With Phonological Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2005, Vol. 48, 61-78. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/006)
History: Received November 6, 2003 , Revised February 12, 2004 , Accepted May 19, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2005, Vol. 48, 61-78. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/006)
History: Received November 6, 2003; Revised February 12, 2004; Accepted May 19, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 85

A growing body of research has documented effects of phonotactic probability on young children's nonword repetition. This study extends this research in 2 ways. First, it compares nonword repetitions by 40 young children with phonological disorders with those by 40 same-age peers with typical phonological development on a nonword repetition task in which the frequency of embedded diphone sequences was varied. Second, it examines the relationship between the frequency effect in the nonword repetition task and other measures of linguistic ability in these children. Children in both groups repeated low-frequency sequences less accurately than high-frequency sequences. The children with phonological disorders were less accurate overall but showed no larger disadvantage for the low-frequency sequences than their age peers. Across the group, the size of the frequency effect was correlated with vocabulary size, but it was independent of measures of speech perception and articulatory ability. These results support the hypothesis that the production difficulty associated with low/frequency sequences is related primarily to vocabulary growth rather than to developments in articulatory or perceptual ability. By contrast, production problems experienced by children with phonological disorders do not appear to result from difficulties in making abstractions over known lexical items. Instead, they may be associated with difficulties in building representations in the primary sensory and motor domains.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC02932 to Jan Edwards and Grant R03 DC005702 to Benjamin Munson and by National Institutes of Health Training Grant T32 DC0051 to Robert A. Fox. We thank the children who participated in the study, the parents who gave their consent, and the schools at which the data were collected. For assistance in stimuli preparation, data collection, data analysis, and manuscript preparation, we thank Molly Babel, Erin Casey, Lynn Carahaly, Lisa Draper, Melissa Epstein, Heidi Hochstetler, Maryann Holtschulte, Bridgett Isermann, Satako Katagiri, Laurie Vasicek, Amy Vitale, Pauline Welby, and S. David White.
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