Lexical and Phonological Organization in Children Evidence From Repetition Tasks Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2005
Lexical and Phonological Organization in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Benjamin Munson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Cyndie L. Swenson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
    Minnesota School District 196, Apple Valley, MN.
  • Shayla C. Manthei
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
    Courage Center, Burnsville, MN.
  • Contact author: Benjamin Munson, PhD, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
    Contact author: Benjamin Munson, PhD, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: Munso005@umn.edu
  • Cyndie L. Swenson is currently affiliated with Minnesota School District 196, Apple Valley, MN. Shayla C. Manthei is currently affiliated with Courage Center, Burnsville, MN.
    Cyndie L. Swenson is currently affiliated with Minnesota School District 196, Apple Valley, MN. Shayla C. Manthei is currently affiliated with Courage Center, Burnsville, MN.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2005
Lexical and Phonological Organization in Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2005, Vol. 48, 108-124. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/009)
History: Received June 25, 2003 , Revised November 24, 2003 , Accepted June 22, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2005, Vol. 48, 108-124. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/009)
History: Received June 25, 2003; Revised November 24, 2003; Accepted June 22, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 42

This study examined the structure of children’s mental lexicons through performance on 2 short experimental tasks, 1 in which children repeated familiar monosyllabic real words varying in neighborhood density and 1 in which they repeated CVC nonwords varying in phonotactic probability. Two groups of typically developing children with mean ages of 4;3 (years;months; n=16) and 7;2 (n=15) participated. In the group of younger children, offset-to-onset response latencies were not systematically affected by lexicality, phonotactic probability, or neighborhood density. Onset-to-onset latencies showed an effect of phonotactic probability on nonword repetition. Children in the older group repeated high-density real words with longer latencies than low-density real words. They also repeated high-probability nonwords with shorter latencies than low-probability nonwords. This was true for both the onset-to-onset and offset-to-onset repetition latencies. Children in both age groups repeated vowels embedded in high-probability nonwords with shorter durations than vowels embedded in low-probability nonwords. These findings suggest that lexical competition and phonological facilitation emerge in development and that the rate of development is different for different dependent measures.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this research were presented at the 2002 annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Atlanta, Georgia; at the 2003 annual Child Phonology Meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; and at invited colloquia in the Northwestern University Department of Linguistics, the Chinese University of Hong Kong Department of Psychology, and the Language and Mind series at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. This research was supported by a New Investigator Award from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, by a Grant-in-Aid of Research, Scholarship, and Artistry from the University of Minnesota Graduate School, and by National Institutes of Health Grant R03 DC05702. We thank Molly Babel and Nancy DeBoe for assistance with participant recruitment and data collection. We gratefully acknowledge audiences at those venues for their helpful comments and feedback. In addition, we thank Mary Beckman, Jan Edwards, Julia Evans, Stefan Frisch, and Kathryn Kohnert for comments on this research.
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