Word-Retrieval Difficulty and Disfluent Speech in Adult Anomic Speakers The relationships existing between measures of disfluency and measures of word-retrieval ability in adult anomic aphasic and adult non-brain-damaged subjects were investigated. Subjects produced single-word naming responses for pictured stimuli consisting of objects, colors, and actions. The obtained number of correct naming responses and word-retrieval latency measurements were related to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1981
Word-Retrieval Difficulty and Disfluent Speech in Adult Anomic Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catherine S. Brown
    Forsyth Memorial Hospital, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
  • Walter L. Cullinan
    University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1981
Word-Retrieval Difficulty and Disfluent Speech in Adult Anomic Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1981, Vol. 24, 358-365. doi:10.1044/jshr.2403.358
History: Received March 10, 1980 , Accepted August 6, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1981, Vol. 24, 358-365. doi:10.1044/jshr.2403.358
History: Received March 10, 1980; Accepted August 6, 1980

The relationships existing between measures of disfluency and measures of word-retrieval ability in adult anomic aphasic and adult non-brain-damaged subjects were investigated. Subjects produced single-word naming responses for pictured stimuli consisting of objects, colors, and actions. The obtained number of correct naming responses and word-retrieval latency measurements were related to the number and types of disfluencies present in the subjects' connected speech samples. The major findings of the investigation include the following: (a) the anomic subject group presented significantly more disfluencies than did the nonaphasic group; (b) the number of disfluencies increased as word-retrieval difficulty increased for the anomic subjects; (c) when word-retrieval difficulty was measured by the number of correct responses those anomic subjects who tended to be most disfluent and to have the greatest word-retrieval difficulty also tended to have the highest proportions of those disfluencies most likely to be considered "stutterings" (part-word repetitions, vocal segregate repetitions, and prolongations) and the lowest proportions of hesitations; and (d) the proportion of stutterings increased as the total number of disfluencies increased for anomic and tot nonaphasic subjects. Implications of results for testing of aphasic patients are discussed.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access