A Reexamination of Some Nonverbal Perceptual Abilities of Language-Impaired and Normal Children as a Function of Age and Sensory Modality A battery of nonverbal perceptual and memory tests were given to 35 language-impaired (LI) and 38 control subjects. Three modalities of tests were given: auditory, visual, and cross-modal (auditory and visual). The purpose was to reexamine some nonverbal perceptual and memory abilities of LI children as a function of age ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1981
A Reexamination of Some Nonverbal Perceptual Abilities of Language-Impaired and Normal Children as a Function of Age and Sensory Modality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paula Tallal
    University of California, San Diego Children's Hospital and Health Center
  • Rachel Stark
    Johns Hopkins Hospital and John F. Kennedy Institute Baltimore, Maryland
  • Clayton Kallman
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • David Mellits
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1981
A Reexamination of Some Nonverbal Perceptual Abilities of Language-Impaired and Normal Children as a Function of Age and Sensory Modality
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1981, Vol. 24, 351-357. doi:10.1044/jshr.2403.351
History: Received February 2, 1980 , Accepted July 25, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1981, Vol. 24, 351-357. doi:10.1044/jshr.2403.351
History: Received February 2, 1980; Accepted July 25, 1980

A battery of nonverbal perceptual and memory tests were given to 35 language-impaired (LI) and 38 control subjects. Three modalities of tests were given: auditory, visual, and cross-modal (auditory and visual). The purpose was to reexamine some nonverbal perceptual and memory abilities of LI children as a function of age and modality of stimulation. Results failed to replicate previous findings of a temporal processing deficit that is specific to the auditory modality in LI children. The LI group made significantly more errors than did controls regardless of modality of stimulation when 2-item sequences were presented rapidly, or when more than two stimuli were presented in series. However, further analyses resolved this apparent conflict between the present and earlier studies by demonstrating that age is an important variable underlying modality specificity of perceptual performance in LI children. Whereas younger LI children were equally impaired when responding to stimuli presented rapidly to the auditory and visual modality, older LI subjects made nearly twice as many errors responding to rapidly presented auditory rather than visual stimuli. This developmental difference did not occur for the control group.

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