The Contingent Negative Variation as an Indicator of Speech Discrimination Difficulty Recent studies have illustrated the usefulness of the contingent negative variation (CNV) in exploring language processing capabilities. The purpose of this study was to investigate how CNV magnitude is influenced by speech discrimination tasks of graded difficulty. Nine young adult subjects performed easy and difficult speech discrimination tasks while cortical ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1981
The Contingent Negative Variation as an Indicator of Speech Discrimination Difficulty
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gary P. Jacobson
    Kent State University, Kent, Ohio
  • Donald P. Gans
    Kent State University, Kent, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1981
The Contingent Negative Variation as an Indicator of Speech Discrimination Difficulty
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1981, Vol. 24, 345-350. doi:10.1044/jshr.2403.345
History: Received June 27, 1979 , Accepted April 10, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1981, Vol. 24, 345-350. doi:10.1044/jshr.2403.345
History: Received June 27, 1979; Accepted April 10, 1981

Recent studies have illustrated the usefulness of the contingent negative variation (CNV) in exploring language processing capabilities. The purpose of this study was to investigate how CNV magnitude is influenced by speech discrimination tasks of graded difficulty. Nine young adult subjects performed easy and difficult speech discrimination tasks while cortical activity was recorded from the vertex. Stimuli consisted of consonant-vowel pairs that were presented in a background of noise. Consistently larger CNV responses were obtained for the difficult versus the easy discrimination task in the nonimperative condition. No consistent trend was found for the imperative condition. These electrophysiological results correspond well with both correct and incorrect discrimination behavior. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access