Early Stutterings Some Aspects of Their Form and Distribution Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1981
Early Stutterings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Oliver Bloodstein
    Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York
  • Marcia Grossman
    Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1981
Early Stutterings
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 298-302. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.298
History: Received December 26, 1979 , Accepted May 7, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 298-302. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.298
History: Received December 26, 1979; Accepted May 7, 1980

The speech of five stutterers ranging in age from 3 years, 10 months to 5 years, 7 months was analyzed to determine the types and loci of stutterings. Word repetition was the most frequent feature in three cases and one of the two predominant features in the remaining two cases. Almost without exception, word repetitions occurred at the beginning of syntactic units. A greater proportion of stutterings of all types appeared on the initial words of sentences or clauses than on the other words. In most cases proportionately more function words than content words were stuttered, as were more monosyllabic than polysyllabic words—just the reverse of the usual pattern in older children and adults. The tendency of older stutterers to have more difficulty on initial consonants than initial vowels appeared in only one case. The findings on the properties of stuttered words were interpreted to mean that word-bound factors as such have little influence on the loci of early stutterings. The results as a whole were related to the hypothesis that early stuttering represents mainly a type of difficulty in either the formulation or the execution of syntactic units.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access