The Attribution of Personality Traits The Stutterer and Nonstutterer Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1981
The Attribution of Personality Traits
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Turnbaugh
    The University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont
  • Barry Guitar
    The University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont
  • Paul Hoffman
    The University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1981
The Attribution of Personality Traits
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 288-291. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.288
History: Received February 8, 1980 , Accepted May 13, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 288-291. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.288
History: Received February 8, 1980; Accepted May 13, 1980

Three videotaped recordings were made of an adult male speaking in an interview situation. Tapes differed as a function of the fluency exhibited by the interviewed speaker (i.e., fluent speech, primary stuttering, secondary stuttering). Three audiotapes were recorded from the videotapes yielding six stimulus tapes. Independent groups of college students saw and/or heard one of the stimulus tapes, each described as an interview with a "male who stutters." The fluent audio- and videotapes were replayed to two additional groups but were described only as an interview with a "male." Groups rated the personality of the speaker after tape presentation. Results revealed no difference in personality trait assignment as a function of experimental variables.

However, in a second experiment two groups of college students rated a hypothetical normal speaker and a hypothetical stutterer as significantly different in personality attributes. Results are discussed with reference to stereotyping behavior.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access