Procedures for Verification of Electrode Placement in EMG Studies of Orofacial and Mandibular Muscles Many muscles used in speech are small and intimately interconnected. There is a need for anatomical and physiological data which would allow identification of the particular muscle fibers being recorded in electromyographic (EMG) investigations. EMG recordings were taken from eighteen orofacial and mandibular muscles while gestures believed to be specific ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1981
Procedures for Verification of Electrode Placement in EMG Studies of Orofacial and Mandibular Muscles
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nicolas J. O'Dwyer
    University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Peter T. Quinn
    University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Barry E. Guitar
    University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Gavin Andrews
    University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Peter D. Neilson
    University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1981
Procedures for Verification of Electrode Placement in EMG Studies of Orofacial and Mandibular Muscles
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 273-288. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.273
History: Received February 26, 1979 , Accepted February 25, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 273-288. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.273
History: Received February 26, 1979; Accepted February 25, 1980

Many muscles used in speech are small and intimately interconnected. There is a need for anatomical and physiological data which would allow identification of the particular muscle fibers being recorded in electromyographic (EMG) investigations.

EMG recordings were taken from eighteen orofacial and mandibular muscles while gestures believed to be specific to each muscle were performed. The anatomic criteria for the placement of the electrodes, the quality of the EMG spikes and interference patterns obtained, and the degree of differentiation of the temporal sequence of activity from that in neighboring muscles were used to decide on the degree of certainty that a particular muscle was being recorded. The appropriateness of each gesture as a stimulus to any muscle was determined on the basis of the level of activation occurring with the gesture relative to other muscles and its degree of variability between subjects.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access