Some Effects of Training on Speech Recognition by Hearing-Impaired Adults The purpose of this research was to determine some of the effects of consonant recognition training on the speech recognition performance of hearing-impaired adults. Two groups of ten subjects each received seven hours of either auditory or visual consonant recognition training, in addition to a standard two-week, group-oriented, inpatient aural ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1981
Some Effects of Training on Speech Recognition by Hearing-Impaired Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian E. Walden
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
  • Sue A. Erdman
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
  • Allen A. Montgomery
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
  • Daniel M. Schwartz
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
  • Robert A. Prosek
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1981
Some Effects of Training on Speech Recognition by Hearing-Impaired Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 207-216. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.207
History: Received November 13, 1979 , Accepted April 3, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 207-216. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.207
History: Received November 13, 1979; Accepted April 3, 1980

The purpose of this research was to determine some of the effects of consonant recognition training on the speech recognition performance of hearing-impaired adults. Two groups of ten subjects each received seven hours of either auditory or visual consonant recognition training, in addition to a standard two-week, group-oriented, inpatient aural rehabilitation program. A third group of fifteen subjects received the standard two-week program, but no supplementary individual consonant recognition training. An audiovisual sentence recognition test, as well as tests of auditory and visual consonant recognition, were administered both before and ibltowing training. Subjects in all three groups significantly increased in their audiovisual sentence recognition performance, but subjects receiving the individual consonant recognition training improved significantly more than subjects receiving only the standard two-week program. A significant increase in consonant recognition performance was observed in the two groups receiving the auditory or visual consonant recognition training. The data are discussed from varying statistical and clinical perspectives.

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