A Study of the Frequency Reading Fundamental Vocal of Young Black Adults This study investigated the measures of central tendency (mean mode) and dispersion (standard deviations and ranges) of the reading fundamental vocal frequency in young black adults. The subjects were 200 (100 males/100 females college student volunteers whose ages ranged from 18 to 29 years, A fundamental frequency analyzer (FLORIDA I) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1981
A Study of the Frequency Reading Fundamental Vocal of Young Black Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amelia I. Hudson
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
  • Anthony Holbrook
    Florida State University, Tallahassee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1981
A Study of the Frequency Reading Fundamental Vocal of Young Black Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 197-201. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.197
History: Received June 4, 1979 , Accepted April 2, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 197-201. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.197
History: Received June 4, 1979; Accepted April 2, 1980

This study investigated the measures of central tendency (mean mode) and dispersion (standard deviations and ranges) of the reading fundamental vocal frequency in young black adults. The subjects were 200 (100 males/100 females college student volunteers whose ages ranged from 18 to 29 years, A fundamental frequency analyzer (FLORIDA I) was used to measure the fundamental vocal frequency. The mean modal fundamental vocal frequency for males was 110.15 Hz, with a mean range from 81.95 Hz to 158.50 Hz. The mean modal fundamental vocal frequency for females was 193.10 Hz, with a mean range from 139,05 Hz to 266.10 Hz, The males showed a slightly greater range expressed in tones than did the females, Compared to a similar white population studied by Fitch & Holbrook (1970), the black population had lower mean modal fundamental vocal frequencies and greater mean frequency ranges, Fitch's white subjects showed a greater range below the mean mode than above it. This behavior was reversed for the black subjects of the present study. Such patterns of vocal behavior may be important clues which alert the listener to the speaker's racial identity.

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