Laryngeal and Manual Reaction Times of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Adults This investigation compared the reaction times of thirteen stuttering and thirteen nonstuttering adults for forefinger button pressing, nonspeeeh vocal initiation, and speech-mode vocal initiation. The stutterers and nonstutterers were matched individually for age, sex, and handedness. The reaction-time stimulus in all response conditions was the offset of a 1000-Hz pure ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1981
Laryngeal and Manual Reaction Times of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan Reich
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • James Till
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Howard Goldsmith
    University of Washington, Seattle
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1981
Laryngeal and Manual Reaction Times of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 192-196. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.192
History: Received August 20, 1979 , Accepted March 28, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 192-196. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.192
History: Received August 20, 1979; Accepted March 28, 1980

This investigation compared the reaction times of thirteen stuttering and thirteen nonstuttering adults for forefinger button pressing, nonspeeeh vocal initiation, and speech-mode vocal initiation. The stutterers and nonstutterers were matched individually for age, sex, and handedness. The reaction-time stimulus in all response conditions was the offset of a 1000-Hz pure tone. Two of the experimental conditions required button pressing with the right and left. forefingers. The remaining four responses required vocal-fold vibration. The nonspeech vocal activity consisted of inspiratory phonation and expiratory throat clearing. The speech-mode vocal activity required production of the isolated vowel//and the word/p/. The results demonstrated that stuttering and nonstuttering adults differed significantly only on tasks requiring speech phonation. These results are compared to previous reaction-time investigations and related to factors which may influence sensory-motor pathways prior to and during speech.

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