Transfer Effects from Listening to Frequency-Controlled and Frequency-Shifted Accelerated Speech Two experiments examined intelligibility of sentences reproduced with increased tonal frequency (the spectrum of the speech signal shifted upward), increased speech rate, or both frequency and speech rate increased. The first experiment showed that both the frequency and speech rate increases independently impaired sentence intelligibility. Sentences played back at increased ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1981
Transfer Effects from Listening to Frequency-Controlled and Frequency-Shifted Accelerated Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William P. Wallace
    University of Nevada, Reno
  • Georgette Koury
    University of Nevada, Reno
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1981
Transfer Effects from Listening to Frequency-Controlled and Frequency-Shifted Accelerated Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 185-191. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.185
History: Received October 4, 1979 , Accepted March 19, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 185-191. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.185
History: Received October 4, 1979; Accepted March 19, 1980

Two experiments examined intelligibility of sentences reproduced with increased tonal frequency (the spectrum of the speech signal shifted upward), increased speech rate, or both frequency and speech rate increased. The first experiment showed that both the frequency and speech rate increases independently impaired sentence intelligibility. Sentences played back at increased rates and increased frequencies also were perceived as having been spoken more rapidly. In the second experiment subjects listened either to practice sentences played back at frequency-shifted (FS) or frequency-controlled (FC) accelerated rates. Subsequent to this practice, an intelligibility test was given on 10 FS and 10 FC accelerated sentences played back at double speed. The accelerated sentences were more intelligible for practice groups than for a no-practice control group, and FC accelerated rates produced more intelligible sentences than FS acceleration. The specific training experiences produced an interaction with the type of test-sentence acceleration early in transfer. The FS accelerated sentences were more intelligible following FS practice compared to FC practice, and the FC accelerated sentences were more intelligible following FC practice compared to FS practice.

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