Auditory Discrimination of Voiceless Fricatives in Children Auditory discrimination of the voiceless fricatives/θ f ∫ s/was studied in 200 subjects between the ages of four and six and a half years. In the test task the subject was asked to remember one of the sounds and then to indicate each time this sound was presented. Two types ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1981
Auditory Discrimination of Voiceless Fricatives in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D. Devenny Phatate
    Adelphi University, Garden City, New York
  • Helen Umano
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1981
Auditory Discrimination of Voiceless Fricatives in Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 162-168. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.162
History: Received September 22, 1977 , Accepted January 3, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1981, Vol. 24, 162-168. doi:10.1044/jshr.2402.162
History: Received September 22, 1977; Accepted January 3, 1980

Auditory discrimination of the voiceless fricatives/θ f ∫ s/was studied in 200 subjects between the ages of four and six and a half years. In the test task the subject was asked to remember one of the sounds and then to indicate each time this sound was presented. Two types of errors were analyzed. An error of omission was a failure to identify the remembered sound, and this type of error did not change with age. An error of commission, a failure to discriminate between the remembered sound and one of the other voiceless fricatives decreased with age. The results are interpreted as support for a theory of the development of auditory perception of speech in which discrimination of some properties in speech, such as relatively weak spectral cues and second formant transitions, have to be learned by a child.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access