Experiments Re: Clinical Application of Reflex Modulation Audiometry Two experiments were conducted on normal hearing adults to assess the audiometric test potential of reflex modulation (RM) when administered according to the descending method of limits. RM describes the inhibitory effect of a tone upon a subsequently occurring eyeblink reflex. Although RM conducted according to the method of constant ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1981
Experiments Re: Clinical Application of Reflex Modulation Audiometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Levi A. Reiter
    University of Kansas, Kansas City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1981
Experiments Re: Clinical Application of Reflex Modulation Audiometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1981, Vol. 24, 92-98. doi:10.1044/jshr.2401.92
History: Received December 19, 1978 , Accepted September 26, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1981, Vol. 24, 92-98. doi:10.1044/jshr.2401.92
History: Received December 19, 1978; Accepted September 26, 1979

Two experiments were conducted on normal hearing adults to assess the audiometric test potential of reflex modulation (RM) when administered according to the descending method of limits. RM describes the inhibitory effect of a tone upon a subsequently occurring eyeblink reflex. Although RM conducted according to the method of constant stimuli has already been shown to produce RM results which agree well with voluntary audiometry in normal and hearing-impaired adults and children, the present concern is with the potential clinical application of RM, and in this regard the descending method may offer certain distinct advantages. In study one, a 2-kHz tone was presented at several descending intensities whereas in study two, four different frequencies (0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) were presented in concurrent fashion, but again, the intensity of the complete set was decreased in successive steps. Sensitivity in both cases was 10 to 15 dB SL. Implications for the clinical application of RM audiometry are discussed.

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