A Comparison of Sign and Verbal Language Training with Nonverbal Retarded Children Twelve nonverbal, hearing, retarded children were matched and then randomly assigned to sign language training, speech training, and placebo groups. Four of the subjects received speech training using the Bricker, Dennison, and Bricker (1976) program, and four subjects received sign language training using an adaptation of the Bricker et al. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1981
A Comparison of Sign and Verbal Language Training with Nonverbal Retarded Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James V. Kahn
    University of Illinois at Chicago Circle, Chicago, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1981
A Comparison of Sign and Verbal Language Training with Nonverbal Retarded Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1981, Vol. 24, 113-119. doi:10.1044/jshr.2401.113
History: Received September 11, 1978 , Accepted February 28, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1981, Vol. 24, 113-119. doi:10.1044/jshr.2401.113
History: Received September 11, 1978; Accepted February 28, 1980

Twelve nonverbal, hearing, retarded children were matched and then randomly assigned to sign language training, speech training, and placebo groups. Four of the subjects received speech training using the Bricker, Dennison, and Bricker (1976) program, and four subjects received sign language training using an adaptation of the Bricker et al. program. The results indicated no statistically significant difference between the verbal and sign language groups though the sign group and verbal group did learn significantly more than the placebo group. A closer examination of the findings indicated that although all four of the sign language subjects learned some signs, only two of the four speech training subjects learned to say any words. The findings were interpreted as indicating that some nonverbal retarded children will benefit more from sign language than speech training. Suggestions for the direction of future research are given.

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