Regulation of Vocal Intensity in the Presence of Feedback Filtering and Amplification Subjects read while their voices were fed back with 0 and 20 dB of amplification. In Experiment I, feedback was returned unfiltered or low-pass filtered with cut-off frequencies of 1000, 500, and 300 Hz. Subjects decreased vocal intensity with amplified feedback when the feedback was unfiltered or low-pass filtered with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1981
Regulation of Vocal Intensity in the Presence of Feedback Filtering and Amplification
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sharon R. Garber
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Gerald M. Siegel
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Herbert L. Pick, Jr.
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1981
Regulation of Vocal Intensity in the Presence of Feedback Filtering and Amplification
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1981, Vol. 24, 104-108. doi:10.1044/jshr.2401.104
History: Received November 8, 1979 , Accepted December 12, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1981, Vol. 24, 104-108. doi:10.1044/jshr.2401.104
History: Received November 8, 1979; Accepted December 12, 1979

Subjects read while their voices were fed back with 0 and 20 dB of amplification. In Experiment I, feedback was returned unfiltered or low-pass filtered with cut-off frequencies of 1000, 500, and 300 Hz. Subjects decreased vocal intensity with amplified feedback when the feedback was unfiltered or low-pass filtered with cut-off frequencies of 1000 or 500 Hz. The amplification effect disappeared when the cut-off frequency was 300 Hz. In Experiment II, feedback was low-pass filtered and amplified in the presence of a steady background noise. The presence of noise potentiated the amplification effect in the unfiltered condition. When filtering was introduced and/or the cut-off frequency was lowered, the amplification effect decreased. In Experiment III, subjects heard their voices unfiltered and high-pass filtered with cut-off frequencies of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz. The amplification effect was the same across filtering conditions, It is suggested that subjects respond differently to high- and low-pass filtering because air- and bone-conducted feedback interact differentially in these conditions. It is hypothesized that changes may he mediated by self-perception of loudness or intelligibility.

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