A Comparison of Speech Intelligibility between Esophageal and Normal Speakers via Three Modes of Presentation This study compared intelligibility scores obtained for sentences read by good-to-superior esophageal speakers with scores obtained for sentences read by normal speakers via three modes of presentation: visual, auditory and auditory-visual combined. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between intelligibility scores for esophageal speakers and for normal speakers in the auditory ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1980
A Comparison of Speech Intelligibility between Esophageal and Normal Speakers via Three Modes of Presentation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dee J. Hubbard
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri
  • Deanie Kushner
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1980
A Comparison of Speech Intelligibility between Esophageal and Normal Speakers via Three Modes of Presentation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1980, Vol. 23, 909-916. doi:10.1044/jshr.2304.909
History: Received March 15, 1979 , Accepted October 2, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1980, Vol. 23, 909-916. doi:10.1044/jshr.2304.909
History: Received March 15, 1979; Accepted October 2, 1979

This study compared intelligibility scores obtained for sentences read by good-to-superior esophageal speakers with scores obtained for sentences read by normal speakers via three modes of presentation: visual, auditory and auditory-visual combined. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between intelligibility scores for esophageal speakers and for normal speakers in the auditory and in the combined conditions. No significant difference was found between the scores for the two groups in the visual condition. Further analysis showed that the esophageal speakers' intelligibility scores improved significantly from the auditory to the combined auditory-visual condition where they most closely approximated, but never equaled, the highest intelligibility scores for normal speakers. Implications of the findings for rehabilitation of esophageal speakers are discussed.

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