Defense Preference and Stutterers' Speech Disfluencies Implications for the Nature of the Disorder Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1980
Defense Preference and Stutterers' Speech Disfluencies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Prins
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Rudolph Beaudet
    San Francisco, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1980
Defense Preference and Stutterers' Speech Disfluencies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1980, Vol. 23, 757-768. doi:10.1044/jshr.2304.757
History: Received August 13, 1979 , Accepted February 5, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1980, Vol. 23, 757-768. doi:10.1044/jshr.2304.757
History: Received August 13, 1979; Accepted February 5, 1980

Psychological defense mechanism preference was assessed in 16 adult stutterers. From this group, two subgroups of six subjects each were identified by their opposite extremes in defensive style: (1) expressive defenders; (2) avoidance defenders. Subsequently, these subgroups were found to be significantly different in measures of stuttering frequency and disfluency type. The expressive defenders showed higher frequency stuttering than the avoidance defenders (21.5% vs. 4.66%) while the avoidance subgroup showed preference for the use of accessory-type disfluencies; that is, interjections, phrase repetitions, and whole word repetitions. The possibility that the speech disfluencies of stutterers may vary as a function of defense preference is discussed in relation to: (1) definitions of stuttering phenomena and the disorder; (2) the developmental nature of stuttering as a problem and the role of learning; (3) different syndromes of stuttering; and (4) the contributions of etiologic versus pathogenic factors to the origins of the disorder.

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