Modification of Maintenance and Generalization during Stuttering Treatment A procedure designed to maintain and generalize the gains achieved during a stuttering treatment was assessed. A performance-contingent schedule of decreasing within-clinic assessments was evaluated when it was programmed with either contingent or noneontingent schedule conditions. The effect of these schedules on stuttering was assessed within BAB and ABA experimental ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1980
Modification of Maintenance and Generalization during Stuttering Treatment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    Cumberland College of Health Sciences, Sydney, Australia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1980
Modification of Maintenance and Generalization during Stuttering Treatment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1980, Vol. 23, 732-745. doi:10.1044/jshr.2304.732
History: Received May 1, 1979 , Accepted October 3, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1980, Vol. 23, 732-745. doi:10.1044/jshr.2304.732
History: Received May 1, 1979; Accepted October 3, 1979

A procedure designed to maintain and generalize the gains achieved during a stuttering treatment was assessed. A performance-contingent schedule of decreasing within-clinic assessments was evaluated when it was programmed with either contingent or noneontingent schedule conditions. The effect of these schedules on stuttering was assessed within BAB and ABA experimental conditions which were applied to nine stutterers divided into two groups. Assessments were made on the speech behavior of subjects within and outside of clinic conditions as well as covertly. The percentage of syllables stuttered and syllable-per-minute data from both groups of subjects indicated that the performance-contingent schedule was associated with both maintained and generalized reductions in stuttering. The clinical validity of this finding is limited, however, because covert assessment data were consistent with outside-clinic performance for only six of the nine subjects.

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