Intelligibility of Time-Compressed Sentential Stimuli Time-compressed monosyllables have been studied relative to the assessment of central auditory disorders. In certain instances, sentential stimuli may be more useful than word lists in central auditory testing, particularly when results may be contaminated by concomitant peripheral hearing losses. Central Institute for the Deaf (CID) and Revised CID sentence ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1980
Intelligibility of Time-Compressed Sentential Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel S. Beasley
    Memphis State University, Memphis, Tennessee
  • Gene W. Bratt
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • William F. Rintelmann
    Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1980
Intelligibility of Time-Compressed Sentential Stimuli
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1980, Vol. 23, 722-731. doi:10.1044/jshr.2304.722
History: Received February 3, 1978 , Accepted August 2, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1980, Vol. 23, 722-731. doi:10.1044/jshr.2304.722
History: Received February 3, 1978; Accepted August 2, 1978

Time-compressed monosyllables have been studied relative to the assessment of central auditory disorders. In certain instances, sentential stimuli may be more useful than word lists in central auditory testing, particularly when results may be contaminated by concomitant peripheral hearing losses. Central Institute for the Deaf (CID) and Revised CID sentence lists and a contrived sentential approximation task were presented to 96 normal hearing young adults at time-compression ratios of 0%, 40%, 60%, and 70%, under sensation levels of 24 and 40 dB. The CID and RCID stimuli were more intelligible than the sentential approximations. The results are presented and discussed as they pertain to central auditory testing and are compared to earlier data using consonant-nucleus-consonant monosyllabic stimuli.

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