Frequency Selectivity in Normally-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Observers This study compares frequency selectivity—as measured by four different methods—in observers with normal hearing and in observers with conductive (non-otosclerotic), otosclerotic, noise-induced, or degenerative hearing losses. Each category of loss was represented by a group of 7 to 10 observers, who were tested at center frequencies of 500 Hz and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1980
Frequency Selectivity in Normally-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Observers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Florentine
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Søren Buus
    Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Bertram Scharf
    Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Eberhard Zwicker
    Institute of Electroacoustics, Technical University, Munich, F.R.G.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1980
Frequency Selectivity in Normally-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Observers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 646-669. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.646
History: Received December 8, 1978 , Accepted July 11, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 646-669. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.646
History: Received December 8, 1978; Accepted July 11, 1979

This study compares frequency selectivity—as measured by four different methods—in observers with normal hearing and in observers with conductive (non-otosclerotic), otosclerotic, noise-induced, or degenerative hearing losses. Each category of loss was represented by a group of 7 to 10 observers, who were tested at center frequencies of 500 Hz and 4000 Hz. For each group, the following four measurements were made: psychoacoustical tuning curves, narrow-band masking, two-tone masking, and loudness summation. Results showed that (a) frequency selectivity was reduced at frequencies where a cochlear hearing loss was present, (b) frequency selectivity was reduced regardless of the test level at which normally-hearing observers and observers with cochlear impairment were compared, (c) all four measures of frequency selectivity were significantly correlated and (d) reduced frequency selectivity was positively correlated with the amount of cochlear hearing loss.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access