Articulatory Behavior Pre and Post Full-Mouth Tooth Extraction and Alveoloplasty A Cinefluorographic Study Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1980
Articulatory Behavior Pre and Post Full-Mouth Tooth Extraction and Alveoloplasty
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gerald Zimmermann
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • J.A. Scott Kelso
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, Connecticut
  • Larry Lander
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1980
Articulatory Behavior Pre and Post Full-Mouth Tooth Extraction and Alveoloplasty
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 630-645. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.630
History: Received June 26, 1978 , Accepted July 13, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 630-645. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.630
History: Received June 26, 1978; Accepted July 13, 1979

High speed cinefluorography was used to track articulatory movements preceding and following full-mouth tooth extraction and alveoloplasty in two subjects. Films also were made of a control subject on two separate days. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of dramatically altering the structural dimensions of the oral cavity on the kinematic parameters of speech. The results showed that the experimental subjects performed differently pre and postoperatively though the changes were in different directions for the two subjects. Differences in both means and variabilities of kinematic parameters were larger between days for the experimental (operated) subjects than for the control subject. The results for the Control subject also showed significant differences in the mean values of kinematic variables between days though these day-to-day differences could not account for the effects found pre- and postoperatively. The results of the kinematic analysis, particularly the finding that transition time was most stable over the experimental conditions for the operated subjects, are used to speculate about the coordination of normal speech.

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