Principal and Differential Effects of Haloperidol and Placebo Treatments upon Speech Disfluencies in Stutterers Fourteen stutterers completed a double-blind crossover study of the effects of Haloperidol and Placebo treatments upon their speech disfluencies. Although clearly not clinically effective, Haloperidol had a statistically significant effect upon reducing disfluency frequency and increasing speaking rate. For most subjects, drug-related reductions in disfluency severity resulted from a decrement ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1980
Principal and Differential Effects of Haloperidol and Placebo Treatments upon Speech Disfluencies in Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Prins
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Theodore Mandelkorn, M.D.
    Childrens Orthopedic Hospital, Seattle, Washington
  • F. Ann Cerf
    University of Washington, Seattle
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1980
Principal and Differential Effects of Haloperidol and Placebo Treatments upon Speech Disfluencies in Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 614-629. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.614
History: Received May 7, 1979 , Accepted July 26, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 614-629. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.614
History: Received May 7, 1979; Accepted July 26, 1979
abstract

Fourteen stutterers completed a double-blind crossover study of the effects of Haloperidol and Placebo treatments upon their speech disfluencies. Although clearly not clinically effective, Haloperidol had a statistically significant effect upon reducing disfluency frequency and increasing speaking rate. For most subjects, drug-related reductions in disfluency severity resulted from a decrement in whole-word and phrase repetition, interjection, and revision-type disfluencies rather than from fewer part-word (elemental) repetitions and prolongations of sound or of silence. Neurotic personality profile correlated positively with an overall placebo effect, and there was a positive correlation between abnormal EEG and the drug effect. These findings are discussed in light of the nature of speech disfluency and stuttering and Haloperidol's biochemical and behavioral actions.

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