Auditory Frequency Selectivity in Normal and Presbycusic Subjects Auditory frequency selectivity was inferred from measurements of the detectability of tonal signals as a function of the cutoff frequency of a low-pass computer-generated noise masker. In Experiment I the effect of small changes in signal-to-noise ratio on inferred auditory frequency selectivity was studied. In Experiment II, frequency selectivity was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1980
Auditory Frequency Selectivity in Normal and Presbycusic Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert H. Margolis
    Ucla School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
  • Seth M. Goldberg
    Ucla School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1980
Auditory Frequency Selectivity in Normal and Presbycusic Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 603-613. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.603
History: Received March 26, 1979 , Accepted August 13, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 603-613. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.603
History: Received March 26, 1979; Accepted August 13, 1979

Auditory frequency selectivity was inferred from measurements of the detectability of tonal signals as a function of the cutoff frequency of a low-pass computer-generated noise masker. In Experiment I the effect of small changes in signal-to-noise ratio on inferred auditory frequency selectivity was studied. In Experiment II, frequency selectivity was determined for five normal-hearing subjects and four subjects with sensorineural hearing loss due to presbycusis. Critical ratios (signal-to-noise ratio at masked threshold) also were determined in Experiment II. The results of Experiment I indicate that the low-pass masking experiment provides a stable estimate of the width, but not the position, of the critical masking band. Experiment II revealed elevated critical ratios for three of the four presbycusic subjects. Some hearing-impaired subjects appeared to have normal frequency selectivity despite elevated critical ratios. Other presbycusic subjects demonstrated impaired auditory frequency selectivity. The results suggest that critical ratio and critical masking band data are free to vary independently in hearing-impaired subjects.

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