Isotonic Vocalis Contraction as a Means of Producing Rapid Decreases in F0 In a first experiment, subjects were presented with frequency modulated tones and instructed to vary their own vocal pitch to match what they were hearing. It was found that the faster a subject modulated his voice, the higher the carrier frequency he produced became relative to that specified as his ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1980
Isotonic Vocalis Contraction as a Means of Producing Rapid Decreases in F0
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nigel Harvey
    University College London, England
  • Pete Howell
    University College London, England
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1980
Isotonic Vocalis Contraction as a Means of Producing Rapid Decreases in F0
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 576-592. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.576
History: Received March 1, 1979 , Accepted October 1, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 576-592. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.576
History: Received March 1, 1979; Accepted October 1, 1979

In a first experiment, subjects were presented with frequency modulated tones and instructed to vary their own vocal pitch to match what they were hearing. It was found that the faster a subject modulated his voice, the higher the carrier frequency he produced became relative to that specified as his target. In a second experiment, subjects were presented with one or two target tones. After one was presented, they were required to reproduce its pitch with their own voice. They did so accurately. After two were presented, they were asked to oscillate the pitch of their voice as rapidly as possible between them. In this case, it was found that the tones which were produced were higher than those specified by the targets. It is argued that the results from both experiments indicate that fast decreases in vocal pitch are produced by isotonic contraction of the vocalis muscles.

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