Familial Stuttering Patterns Are Not Related to One Measure of Severity The possibility of a genetic component to the severity of stuttering was investigated using data on 184 adult stutterers and their families. Frequency of stuttering during a pre-treatment oral reading task was used as the severity measure for each of the index cases. Information on whether or not a relative ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1980
Familial Stuttering Patterns Are Not Related to One Measure of Severity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth K. Kidd
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
  • Raymond C. Heimbuch
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
  • Mary Ann Records
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
  • Gary Oehlert
    Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
  • Ronald L. Webster
    Hollins College, Roanoke, Virginia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1980
Familial Stuttering Patterns Are Not Related to One Measure of Severity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 539-545. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.539
History: Received February 5, 1979 , Accepted July 12, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 539-545. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.539
History: Received February 5, 1979; Accepted July 12, 1979

The possibility of a genetic component to the severity of stuttering was investigated using data on 184 adult stutterers and their families. Frequency of stuttering during a pre-treatment oral reading task was used as the severity measure for each of the index cases. Information on whether or not a relative ever stuttered was obtained on all first degree relatives. The family data variables, including sex and exact relationship, combined with birthdate and sex of index case were used in three types of analyses: multiple regressions, AID regressions, and stepwise regressions. None of the variables tested, including stuttering among first degree relatives, was a predictor of severity of stuttering in the index case. We conclude that this measure of severity is not related to the genetic factors which predispose to stuttering.

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