Vocal Cues as Indices of Schizophrenia The hypothesis that schizophrenic patients can be differentiated from non-schizo-phrenic patients was tested. In addition, the impressions about personality characteristics conveyed by voice quality were explored. Ten schizophrenics and ten non-schizophrenic patients, all from a State hospital, were recorded individually as they read the same passage. Five judges listened to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1980
Vocal Cues as Indices of Schizophrenia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ellen H. Todt
    Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah
  • Robert J. Howell
    Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1980
Vocal Cues as Indices of Schizophrenia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 517-526. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.517
History: Received January 24, 1979 , Accepted June 12, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1980, Vol. 23, 517-526. doi:10.1044/jshr.2303.517
History: Received January 24, 1979; Accepted June 12, 1979

The hypothesis that schizophrenic patients can be differentiated from non-schizo-phrenic patients was tested. In addition, the impressions about personality characteristics conveyed by voice quality were explored. Ten schizophrenics and ten non-schizophrenic patients, all from a State hospital, were recorded individually as they read the same passage. Five judges listened to randomized recordings and completed a questionnaire on each speaker to indicate whether the subject was schizophrenic, to rate the degree of the subject's psychopathology, to rate vocal behavior with a Voice Characteristics Scale made up of six adjectives, and to rate vocal indices of personality disorder with a Voice Psychopathology Scale made up of 26 adjectives describing pathological personality characteristics. The schizophrenics were distinguished from non-schizophrenics on the basis of voice quality. The schizophrenic patients were seen as more inefficient, despondent, and moody. Information conveyed by speakers' voices was explored by a factor analytic technique. Four factors, general disintegration, dysphoria, social distance, and agitation, were identified.

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