Measurement of Speech Quality as a Tool to Optimize the Fitting of a Hearing Aid The purpose of the present research was to develop a theoretical basis for the adjustment of hearing aid frequency response based on speech quality measurements. Speech quality measurements were made using continuous discourse and a category rating procedure for the following dimensions: intelligibility, pleasantness, loudness, effort, noisiness, and total impression. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1995
Measurement of Speech Quality as a Tool to Optimize the Fitting of a Hearing Aid
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jill E. Preminger
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Dianne J. Van Tasell
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Currently affiliated with Kean College of New Jersey.
    Currently affiliated with Kean College of New Jersey.×
  • Contact author: Jill E. Preminger, PhD, Department of Special Education and Individualized Services, Kean College of New Jersey, Union, NJ 07083. E-mail: jpreming@turt30.kean.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1995
Measurement of Speech Quality as a Tool to Optimize the Fitting of a Hearing Aid
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1995, Vol. 38, 726-736. doi:10.1044/jshr.3803.726
History: Received May 12, 1994 , Accepted January 17, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1995, Vol. 38, 726-736. doi:10.1044/jshr.3803.726
History: Received May 12, 1994; Accepted January 17, 1995

The purpose of the present research was to develop a theoretical basis for the adjustment of hearing aid frequency response based on speech quality measurements. Speech quality measurements were made using continuous discourse and a category rating procedure for the following dimensions: intelligibility, pleasantness, loudness, effort, noisiness, and total impression. Speech quality ratings were obtained from a group of listeners with hearing loss who wore hearing aids. The stimulus conditions simulated hearing aid frequency response alterations within a frequency response range where intelligibility was held constant at or near 100%. The subject ratings revealed that (a) different listeners interpreted the individual dimensions in different ways; (b) within listeners, most of the dimensions were unique; that is, they were rated differently; and (c) across listeners, pleasantness was the dimension most highly correlated with total impression.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NIDCD Grant DC00110 and the Bryng Bryngelson Communication Disorders Fund at the University of Minnesota. Portions of this paper were presented at the November 1994 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association held in New Orleans. We wish to thank M. Davison, R. Schlauch, C. Speaks, and N. Viemeister for their guidance during the completion of this project.
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