Conflict Resolution Abilities of Children With Specific Language Impairment and Children With Normal Language This study explored the conflict resolution ability of 30 children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 30 children with normal language (NL) in grades 3 through 7. The children participated in a hypothetical problem-solving activity in which an imaginary conflict was presented and a hypothetical solution was required. They also ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1995
Conflict Resolution Abilities of Children With Specific Language Impairment and Children With Normal Language
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lizbeth J. Stevens
    Warren Woods Schools Berkley, MI
  • Lynn S. Bliss
    Wayne State University Detroit, MI
  • Contact author: Lizbeth Stevens, PhD, 1922 Edgewood, Berkley, Ml 48072.
    Contact author: Lizbeth Stevens, PhD, 1922 Edgewood, Berkley, Ml 48072.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1995
Conflict Resolution Abilities of Children With Specific Language Impairment and Children With Normal Language
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1995, Vol. 38, 599-611. doi:10.1044/jshr.3803.599
History: Received June 1, 1993 , Accepted November 2, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1995, Vol. 38, 599-611. doi:10.1044/jshr.3803.599
History: Received June 1, 1993; Accepted November 2, 1994

This study explored the conflict resolution ability of 30 children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 30 children with normal language (NL) in grades 3 through 7. The children participated in a hypothetical problem-solving activity in which an imaginary conflict was presented and a hypothetical solution was required. They also engaged in role enactments of conflicts. The children with SLI suggested fewer types of strategies to resolve hypothetical conflicts than their peers with NL. The groups did not differ in the number of strategy types used in the role-enactment contexts. The children with receptive and expressive SLI performed more poorly than the children with primarily expressive language deficits only on the role-enactment task. Similarities and differences in types of strategy used by the children with SLI and those with NL were found in both tasks. Explanations are offered for these findings.

Acknowledgments
This research was based on the first author’s dissertation, conducted under the direction of the second author. Appreciation is given to the members of the committee: Larry Miller, John Panagos, Kathleen Pistono, and Carolyn Shantz, as well as to the reviewers and editors of this manuscript. Appreciation is also given to Macomb County Intermediate School district; to the children, parents, and administrators who assisted in data collection. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 1992 ASHA Convention, San Antonio, TX.
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