Voice Intelligibility in Patients Who Have Undergone Laryngectomies In this paper, we evaluate the speech intelligibility of two groups of Spanish-speaking people who have undergone laryngectomies: a group who used esophageal speech and a group who used tracheoesophageal (TES) prostheses. Audio recordings of 24 Spanish words produced by each talker were presented to a group of normal-hearing naive ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1995
Voice Intelligibility in Patients Who Have Undergone Laryngectomies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jose L. Miralles
    Universitat de Valencia Valencia, Spain
  • Teresa Cervera
    Universitat de Valencia Valencia, Spain
  • Contact author: Jose L. Miralles, MD, Departamento de Psicologia Basica, Facultad de Psicologia, Universidad de Valencia, Avenida Blasco Ibañez, 21, Valencia 46008, Spain.
    Contact author: Jose L. Miralles, MD, Departamento de Psicologia Basica, Facultad de Psicologia, Universidad de Valencia, Avenida Blasco Ibañez, 21, Valencia 46008, Spain.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1995
Voice Intelligibility in Patients Who Have Undergone Laryngectomies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1995, Vol. 38, 564-571. doi:10.1044/jshr.3803.564
History: Received November 23, 1993 , Accepted December 15, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1995, Vol. 38, 564-571. doi:10.1044/jshr.3803.564
History: Received November 23, 1993; Accepted December 15, 1994

In this paper, we evaluate the speech intelligibility of two groups of Spanish-speaking people who have undergone laryngectomies: a group who used esophageal speech and a group who used tracheoesophageal (TES) prostheses. Audio recordings of 24 Spanish words produced by each talker were presented to a group of normal-hearing naive listeners who phonetically transcribed their responses. Listeners’ responses were registered in confusion matrices. Results indicate that differences between these two groups of patients appear when we consider phoneme types. The difficulty in producing the voicing distinction appeared in both TES and esophageal talkers. This finding is consistent with studies of English-speaking laryngectomized patients. Considering manner of production, fricative consonants had the highest number of confusions with the other phoneme class in the TES group, whereas in the esophageal group nasals resulted the highest number of confusions. However, ANOVA showed that differences between the two groups were not significant.

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