The Indians Have Many Terms for It Stuttering among the Bannock-Shoshoni Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 1983
The Indians Have Many Terms for It
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gerald Zimmermann
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Sven Liljeblad
    University of Nevada, Reno
  • Arthur Frank
    Los Angeles Special School, Los Angeles, California
  • Charlotte Cleeland
    Idaho State University, Pocatello
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 01, 1983
The Indians Have Many Terms for It
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1983, Vol. 26, 315-318. doi:10.1044/jshr.2602.315
History: Received May 12, 1982 , Accepted June 30, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1983, Vol. 26, 315-318. doi:10.1044/jshr.2602.315
History: Received May 12, 1982; Accepted June 30, 1982

This report follows by 23 years correspondence between Wendell Johnson and Sven Liljeblad in which Liljeblad pointed out that among North American "nonstuttering" Indians there were Indians who stuttered, fie also reported several terms that referred to stuttering. An unpublished study reported by Frank confirmed Liljeblad's claims. Since we must rely on published reports, it is important to get these findings into print for future scholars. Though these findings in no way refute the claimed importance of linguistics and cultural variables as contributing to the development of stuttering, they do call to question evidence supporting the view that stuttering is a diagnosogenic disorder. Historical and sosciological issues related to these contradictory findings are similar to those discussed by Freeman.

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