Hemisphericity in Aphasic Language Recovery A hemispheric time-sharing paradigm used to assess language lateralization was administered to eight Broca's aphasics and a matched normal control group. All normal speakers revealed the expected right-hand-only disruption (indicative of left hemispheric language lateralization) in finger-tapping rate during concurrent expressive and receptive language tasks. The aphasics, as a group, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1983
Hemisphericity in Aphasic Language Recovery
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathy C. Klingman
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Harvey M. Sussman
    The University of Texas at Austin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1983
Hemisphericity in Aphasic Language Recovery
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1983, Vol. 26, 249-256. doi:10.1044/jshr.2602.249
History: Received October 13, 1981 , Accepted July 21, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1983, Vol. 26, 249-256. doi:10.1044/jshr.2602.249
History: Received October 13, 1981; Accepted July 21, 1982

A hemispheric time-sharing paradigm used to assess language lateralization was administered to eight Broca's aphasics and a matched normal control group. All normal speakers revealed the expected right-hand-only disruption (indicative of left hemispheric language lateralization) in finger-tapping rate during concurrent expressive and receptive language tasks. The aphasics, as a group, revealed symmetrical manual interference indicative of bilateral language representation. Three aphasics showed consistent right-hemisphere lateralization. Whereas all normal speakers had equivalent interference across expressive and receptive language tasks, the Broca's aphasies were more adversely affected during concurrent finger tapping and expressive performance. Aphasic lateralization profiles were found to be unrelated either to language proficiency measures (BDAE) or to the site/extent of cortical lesions derived from CAT scans.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access