Spectrographic Analysis of Vowel and Word Duration in Apraxia of Speech Most nomml speakers of English reduce the duration of the stem word vowel as words increase in length. Theoretically, this durational reduction reflects low-level linguistic knowledge. We posed two questions in this study: First, do speakers with apraxia of speech progressively reduce vowel durations as words increase in length, and, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1983
Spectrographic Analysis of Vowel and Word Duration in Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Collins
    Wm. S. Middleton Memorial VA Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin
  • John C. Rosenbek
    Wm. S. Middleton Memorial VA Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Robert T. Wertz
    VA Hospital, Martinez, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1983
Spectrographic Analysis of Vowel and Word Duration in Apraxia of Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1983, Vol. 26, 224-230. doi:10.1044/jshr.2602.224
History: Received March 27, 1981 , Accepted July 14, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1983, Vol. 26, 224-230. doi:10.1044/jshr.2602.224
History: Received March 27, 1981; Accepted July 14, 1982

Most nomml speakers of English reduce the duration of the stem word vowel as words increase in length. Theoretically, this durational reduction reflects low-level linguistic knowledge. We posed two questions in this study: First, do speakers with apraxia of speech progressively reduce vowel durations as words increase in length, and, second, do these vowel and word durations differ significantly from normal productions?

We asked 11 apraxia of speech patients and 11 normal speakers to repeat three sets of three words which progressively increased in length, and we analyzed these productions spectrographically. Our results revealed that both groups reduced vowel duration its words increased in length. Word and vowel duration for apraxia of speech patients, however, were often significantly longer than those for normal speakers. Our results suggest that vowel reduction is a robust phenomenon which resists impairment in apraxia of speech, despite often significant disturbances in motor programming.

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