"Compensatory Articulation" Under Conditions of Reduced Afferent Information A Dynamic Formulation Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1983
"Compensatory Articulation" Under Conditions of Reduced Afferent Information
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. A. Scott Kelso
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Betty Tuller
    Cornell University Medical College, New York Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1983
"Compensatory Articulation" Under Conditions of Reduced Afferent Information
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1983, Vol. 26, 217-224. doi:10.1044/jshr.2602.217
History: Received December 17, 1981 , Accepted July 30, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1983, Vol. 26, 217-224. doi:10.1044/jshr.2602.217
History: Received December 17, 1981; Accepted July 30, 1982

A well-established feature of speech production is that talkers, faced with either anticipated or unanticipated perturbations. can spontaneously adjust the movement patterns of articulators such that the acoustic output remains relatively undistorted. Less clear is the nature of the underlying processes involved. In this study we, examined five subjects' productions of the point Vowels /i, o, u / i n isolation and of the same vowels embedded in a dynamic speech context under normal conditions and under a combined condition, in which (a) the mandible was fixed by means of a bite block; (b) proprioceptive information was reduced through bilateral anesthetization of the temporomandibular joint; (c) tactile information from the oral mucosa was reduced by application of a topical anesthetic; and (d) auditory information was masked by white noise. Minimal distortion of the formant patterns was found in the combined condition. These findings are unfavorable for central (e.g., predictive simulation) or peripheral oral closed-loop models, both of which require reliable peripheral information; they are more in line with recent work suggesting that movement goals may be achieved by muscle collectives that behave in a way that is qualitatively similar to a nonlinear vibratory system.

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