Phonatory and Manual Reaction Times of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Children This investigation compared the simple reaction times of 13 stuttering and 13 nonstuttering children matched individually for age. Sex, and Handedness. The reaction time stimulus in all response conditions was the offset of a 100-Hz pure tone. Two of the experimental conditions required button-pressing responses, one using the left forefinger ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1983
Phonatory and Manual Reaction Times of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James A. Till
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Long Beach, California
  • Alan Reich
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Stanley Dickey
    Seattle Public School District, Seattle, Washington
  • James Seiber
    Issaquah School District, Issaquah, Washington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1983
Phonatory and Manual Reaction Times of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1983, Vol. 26, 171-180. doi:10.1044/jshr.2602.171
History: Received April 9, 1981 , Accepted July 13, 1982
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1983, Vol. 26, 171-180. doi:10.1044/jshr.2602.171
History: Received April 9, 1981; Accepted July 13, 1982

This investigation compared the simple reaction times of 13 stuttering and 13 nonstuttering children matched individually for age. Sex, and Handedness. The reaction time stimulus in all response conditions was the offset of a 100-Hz pure tone. Two of the experimental conditions required button-pressing responses, one using the left forefinger and the other the right. The remaining for experimental conditions required phonatory responses. The nonspeech phonatory responses consisted of inspiratory phonation, and expiratory throat clearing the speech-like phonatory responses required abrupt initiation of the isolated vowel // and the word upper //. The stuttering children were slower and more variable than the normal children only during phonatory initiation.of throat clearing and //. The results are compared to previous reaction time investigations with both children and adults and related to certain factors which potentially can influence sensorimotor pathways prior to and during speech.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access