Hearing Loss and Auditory Lateralization An experiment was conducted with 75 subjects (61 with hearing loss and 14 without) to determine if hard-of-hearing listeners could benefit from binaural cues to auditory space. Both speech and noise signals were presented through earphones, and the auditory cues to phenomenal space were provided by reversing the interaural phase ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1965
Hearing Loss and Auditory Lateralization
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William Melnick
    Bioacoustics Laboratory, Eye and Ear Hospital and School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Robert C. Bilger
    Bioacoustics Laboratory, Eye and Ear Hospital and School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1965
Hearing Loss and Auditory Lateralization
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1965, Vol. 8, 3-12. doi:10.1044/jshr.0801.03
History: Received December 10, 1964
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1965, Vol. 8, 3-12. doi:10.1044/jshr.0801.03
History: Received December 10, 1964

An experiment was conducted with 75 subjects (61 with hearing loss and 14 without) to determine if hard-of-hearing listeners could benefit from binaural cues to auditory space. Both speech and noise signals were presented through earphones, and the auditory cues to phenomenal space were provided by reversing the interaural phase of the noise. The results indicate that hard-of-hearing listeners are able to make approximately the same use of these binaural cues as listeners with normal hearing.

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