Pronominalization in the Language of Deaf Students Four hundred and eighty deaf students (age 10 to 18 years) and 60 hearing children (age eight to 10 years) were required to complete a stimulus sentence by selecting the appropriate pronoun from a list provided. The results indicated that subject and object case pronouns were easier than possessive adjectives, ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   March 01, 1976
Pronominalization in the Language of Deaf Students
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R. B. Wilbur
    University of Illinois, Champaign
  • D. S. Montanelli
    University of Illinois, Champaign
  • S. P. Quigley
    University of Illinois, Champaign
Article Information
Tutorials
Tutorial   |   March 01, 1976
Pronominalization in the Language of Deaf Students
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1976, Vol. 19, 120-140. doi:10.1044/jshr.1901.120
History: Received December 27, 1974 , Accepted October 27, 1975
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1976, Vol. 19, 120-140. doi:10.1044/jshr.1901.120
History: Received December 27, 1974; Accepted October 27, 1975

Four hundred and eighty deaf students (age 10 to 18 years) and 60 hearing children (age eight to 10 years) were required to complete a stimulus sentence by selecting the appropriate pronoun from a list provided. The results indicated that subject and object case pronouns were easier than possessive adjectives, which were in turn easier than possessive pronouns and reflexives. Correct use of relative pronouns was the most difficult for both deaf and hearing subjects. Generalizations about the acquisition of the pronoun system must be limited, as it appeared that pronouns are mastered on a pronoun-by-pronoun basis rather than by categories (person, number, case) for both the deaf and hearing subjects.

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