Verbal Coding Strategies Used by Hearing-Impaired Individuals A paired-associate verbal learning task was used to determine the type of perceptual coding strategies hearing-impaired persons use in auditory perceptual processing of language. Four lists of word pairs were devised, whereby the word pairs in each list were characterized as sharing either similar sign-similar meaning, dissimilar sign-similar meaning, similar ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1975
Verbal Coding Strategies Used by Hearing-Impaired Individuals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert D. Moulton
    Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas
  • Daniel S. Beasley
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1975
Verbal Coding Strategies Used by Hearing-Impaired Individuals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1975, Vol. 18, 559-570. doi:10.1044/jshr.1803.559
History: Received September 19, 1974 , Accepted May 15, 1975
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1975, Vol. 18, 559-570. doi:10.1044/jshr.1803.559
History: Received September 19, 1974; Accepted May 15, 1975

A paired-associate verbal learning task was used to determine the type of perceptual coding strategies hearing-impaired persons use in auditory perceptual processing of language. Four lists of word pairs were devised, whereby the word pairs in each list were characterized as sharing either similar sign-similar meaning, dissimilar sign-similar meaning, similar sign-dissimilar meaning, or dissimilar sign-dissimilar meaning. Severely hearing-impaired subjects were required to replace the missing word associated with the word pairs. The results showed that, while the subjects were able to code the verbal material on both a sign basis and a semantic basis, the semantic coding strategy appeared to be more efficient than the sign coding strategy. The findings are related to earlier investigations and are explained according to a theoretical model of perception.

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