Self-Retrieval and Articulatory Retention The effect of training in self-retrieval on articulatory recall was examined. Elementary school children practiced the syllables /çiks/ and /çɔlt/ under two conditions: imitation and self-retrieval. In the latter condition subjects were asked to say the test object rather than to imitate its name. Over intervals of one day and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1975
Self-Retrieval and Articulatory Retention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harris Winitz
    University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Betty Bellerose
    University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1975
Self-Retrieval and Articulatory Retention
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1975, Vol. 18, 466-477. doi:10.1044/jshr.1803.466
History: Received August 10, 1973 , Accepted April 4, 1975
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1975, Vol. 18, 466-477. doi:10.1044/jshr.1803.466
History: Received August 10, 1973; Accepted April 4, 1975

The effect of training in self-retrieval on articulatory recall was examined. Elementary school children practiced the syllables /çiks/ and /çɔlt/ under two conditions: imitation and self-retrieval. In the latter condition subjects were asked to say the test object rather than to imitate its name. Over intervals of one day and five days there was no difference in retention as a function of the type of pretraining. Imitative responses decayed little over time and were, in general, always higher than self-retrieval responses regardless of the type of training during acquisition (self-retrieval or imitation).

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