Dimensions of Consonant Perception in Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners Judgments of consonant similarity were obtained from subjects who had normal hearing, high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, or relatively flat sensorineural hearing loss. The individual differences model through program INDSCAL was used to derive a set of perceptual features empirically from the similarity judgments, and to group the subjects on the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1975
Dimensions of Consonant Perception in Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian E. Walden
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
  • Allen A. Montgomery
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1975
Dimensions of Consonant Perception in Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1975, Vol. 18, 444-455. doi:10.1044/jshr.1803.444
History: Received August 14, 1974 , Accepted March 24, 1975
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1975, Vol. 18, 444-455. doi:10.1044/jshr.1803.444
History: Received August 14, 1974; Accepted March 24, 1975

Judgments of consonant similarity were obtained from subjects who had normal hearing, high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, or relatively flat sensorineural hearing loss. The individual differences model through program INDSCAL was used to derive a set of perceptual features empirically from the similarity judgments, and to group the subjects on the basis of strength of feature usage. The analysis revealed that sonorance was the dominant dimension in the similarity judgments of the subjects with high-frequency hearing losses, while sibilance tended to dominate the judgments of the subjects with flat audiometric configurations. The normal-hearing subjects tended to weight these two dimensions approximately equally. These differences in similarity judgments were observed based upon audiometric configuration, despite the fact that the two hearing-impaired groups were not unique in word-recognition ability.

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