Visual and Auditory Sequence Learning in Hearing-Impaired Children Two hearing impaired groups, one diagnosed as deaf, the other as aphasic, at two age levels, CA 6–7 and CA 10–11, with 8 subjects in each group, were compared to a control hearing group of 16 subjects at each age level. All subjects were given four paired-associate tasks: a visual ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1966
Visual and Auditory Sequence Learning in Hearing-Impaired Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hans G. Furth
    Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C.
  • Peter B. Pufall
    Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1966
Visual and Auditory Sequence Learning in Hearing-Impaired Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 441-449. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.441
History: Received March 14, 1966
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 441-449. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.441
History: Received March 14, 1966

Two hearing impaired groups, one diagnosed as deaf, the other as aphasic, at two age levels, CA 6–7 and CA 10–11, with 8 subjects in each group, were compared to a control hearing group of 16 subjects at each age level. All subjects were given four paired-associate tasks: a visual discrete task with six associations (DPA) and three 2- to 6-sequence tasks with combinatory sequences as stimuli; one sequence task showed visual stimuli in simultaneous presentation (SIM), another in successive (SUC), and a third presented auditory successive sequences (AUD).

The main results indicated no differences between aphasic and deaf except that the younger aphasics were poorer on AUD. The younger hearing-impaired were equal to controls on DPA, but poorer on SUC and AUD. For all groups SIM and for controls also AUD was easier than SUC.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access