Some Characteristics of the Peak Latency and Amplitude of the Acoustically Evoked Response This experiment explored some characteristics of peak latency and amplitude of the human evoked auditory response as functions of time and number of signals at two sensation levels (20 and 40 dB) in 10 subjects. As signal intensity increased, the number of responses elicited increased, the amplitude of the responses ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1966
Some Characteristics of the Peak Latency and Amplitude of the Acoustically Evoked Response
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Darrell E. Rose
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois
  • Howard B. Ruhm
    University of Oklahoma Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1966
Some Characteristics of the Peak Latency and Amplitude of the Acoustically Evoked Response
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 412-422. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.412
History: Received December 9, 1965
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 412-422. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.412
History: Received December 9, 1965

This experiment explored some characteristics of peak latency and amplitude of the human evoked auditory response as functions of time and number of signals at two sensation levels (20 and 40 dB) in 10 subjects.

As signal intensity increased, the number of responses elicited increased, the amplitude of the responses increased, and the latency of the first two components of the response decreased. The amplitudes and latencies of any component of the evoked response did not change significantly as a function of number of signals presented.

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