Relation of Bekesy Tracings to Personality and Electrophysiologic Measures Bekesy amplitudes of 10 white men, 10 white women, 10 colored men, and 10 colored women were compared and also correlated with MMPI personality measures, EEG amplitude changes, heart rate changes, and skin-resistance levels and changes. All subjects had normal hearing. It was initially proposed that normal-hearing individuals who are ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1966
Relation of Bekesy Tracings to Personality and Electrophysiologic Measures
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David C. Shepherd
    The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
  • Robert Goldstein
    The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1966
Relation of Bekesy Tracings to Personality and Electrophysiologic Measures
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 385-411. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.385
History: Received May 21, 1965
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 385-411. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.385
History: Received May 21, 1965

Bekesy amplitudes of 10 white men, 10 white women, 10 colored men, and 10 colored women were compared and also correlated with MMPI personality measures, EEG amplitude changes, heart rate changes, and skin-resistance levels and changes. All subjects had normal hearing. It was initially proposed that normal-hearing individuals who are similar in personality and who have similar emotional changes (measured by electrophysiologic recordings) during Bekesy audiometry will produce tracings of similar amplitude. Findings indicate that the size of Bekesy amplitudes do relate to personality as well as to emotional changes that occur during Bekesy audiometry. These relations, however, are specific to Bekesy amplitudes produced with a fast (2.5 dB/sec) continuous stimulus, dependent upon like skin resistance levels and probably independent of race and sex. Clear patterns of relations involving personality and electrophysiologic measures and Bekesy amplitudes traced with a fast (2.5 dB/sec) pulsed, slow (0.625 dB/sec) continuous, and slow pulsed stimulus, were not evident.

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