Differential Sensitivity to Duration of Acoustic Signals Experiments were conducted to assess differential sensitivity to acoustic signal duration under various combinations of reference duration, sensation level, and signal frequency, and to determine whether hearing impairment, ostensibly due to cochlear pathology, affects such discrimination. The absolute DL (difference limen) was linear as a function of reference duration at ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1966
Differential Sensitivity to Duration of Acoustic Signals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Howard B. Ruhm
    University of Oklahoma Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Eugene O. Mencke
    University of Oklahoma Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Braxton Milburn
    University of Oklahoma Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • William A. Cooper, Jr.
    University of Oklahoma Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Darrell E. Rose
    University of Oklahoma Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1966
Differential Sensitivity to Duration of Acoustic Signals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 371-384. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.371
History: Received October 11, 1965
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 371-384. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.371
History: Received October 11, 1965

Experiments were conducted to assess differential sensitivity to acoustic signal duration under various combinations of reference duration, sensation level, and signal frequency, and to determine whether hearing impairment, ostensibly due to cochlear pathology, affects such discrimination.

The absolute DL (difference limen) was linear as a function of reference duration at both 10 dB and 50 dB sensation levels in normal subjects and in those with presumed cochlear pathology. When a 10 dB SL signal was used, the mean absolute DL increased at the rate of 2.63 msec per 100-msec increase in reference duration. A concomitant increase of 2.38 msec per 100-msec increase in reference duration was observed when a 50 db SL signal was employed. Neither the signal frequency nor the presence of sensorineural hearing loss affected the duration DL, whereas a sensation level effect was exhibited by both types of subject. A smaller limen was obtained at 50 dB SL than at 10 dB SL.

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