The Averaged Evoked Response to Auditory Stimulation Evoked responses of 160 normal-hearing subjects to auditory stimuli (clicks) were recorded, and data related to the latency, amplitude, and frequency of occurrence of various late components were studied. Negative peaks (vertex referred to earlobe) at 85 and 260 msec and a positive peak at 160 msec occurred often enough ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1966
The Averaged Evoked Response to Auditory Stimulation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lloyd L. Price
    The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
  • Benjamin Rosenblüt
    The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
  • Robert Goldstein
    The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
  • David C. Shepherd
    The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1966
The Averaged Evoked Response to Auditory Stimulation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 361-370. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.361
History: Received August 6, 1965
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 361-370. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.361
History: Received August 6, 1965

Evoked responses of 160 normal-hearing subjects to auditory stimuli (clicks) were recorded, and data related to the latency, amplitude, and frequency of occurrence of various late components were studied. Negative peaks (vertex referred to earlobe) at 85 and 260 msec and a positive peak at 160 msec occurred often enough and with sufficient amplitude to be useful as indicators of response to auditory stimulation. Frequency of occurrence and latency did not appear related to the race, sex, or age of the subject nor to the side of the head from which the recording was taken. The amplitudes are related to these variables. White subjects gave larger responses than colored subjects, females gave larger responses than males, younger and older subjects gave larger responses than those in between, and the responses from the contralateral side of the head (re stimulated ear) tended to be larger than those from the ipsilateral side. Thresholds for the evoked response to clicks are very near voluntary thresholds for the same stimuli in normal-hearing young adults.

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