Measurement of Articulatory Merit It is shown that a specimen of speech may be assigned a semiobjective merit rating that correlates highly with subjective estimates of merit. The rating instrument, termed the Articulatory Product, multiplies a measure of articulatory accuracy and a measure of speaking time: A.P.​ = WW0 × TT0, T ≤ T0          = WW × T0T, T> T0,View Large where W0 is the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1966
Measurement of Articulatory Merit
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Newman Guttman
    Bell Telephone Laboratories, Inc., Murray Hill, New Jersey
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1966
Measurement of Articulatory Merit
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 323-339. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.323
History: Received November 23, 1965
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1966, Vol. 9, 323-339. doi:10.1044/jshr.0903.323
History: Received November 23, 1965

It is shown that a specimen of speech may be assigned a semiobjective merit rating that correlates highly with subjective estimates of merit. The rating instrument, termed the Articulatory Product, multiplies a measure of articulatory accuracy and a measure of speaking time:

A.P.=WW0×TT0, TT0=WW×T0T, T>T0,
where W0 is the total number of words in a text, W is the number of “correct words” (the number of words judged by an expert to be accurately spoken), T0 is an optimum speaking time for the text, and T is the measured speaking time. A.P., derived in this manner, approximates the average cross correlation of received and standard words within the observer. Inasmuch as the analysis is based on varied types of speech—natural, fast, slow, stuttered, and foreign-accented—A.P. appears to be applicable to speech free of voice-quality complications. It does not, however, appear to be an instrument sufficiently sensitive to be applied exclusively to unimpaired speech.

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