Phonological and Motor Errors in Individuals With Acquired Sound Production Impairment PurposeThis study aimed to compare sound production errors arising due to phonological processing impairment with errors arising due to motor speech impairment.MethodTwo speakers with similar clinical profiles who produced similar consonant cluster simplification errors were examined using a repetition task. We compared both overall accuracy and acoustic details of hundreds ... Supplement: Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies
Supplement: Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies  |   October 01, 2012
Phonological and Motor Errors in Individuals With Acquired Sound Production Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adam Buchwald
    New York University
  • Michele Miozzo
    University of Cambridge, England
  • Correspondence to Adam Buchwald: buchwald@nyu.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler
    Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody
Supplement: Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies   |   October 01, 2012
Phonological and Motor Errors in Individuals With Acquired Sound Production Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, S1573-S1586. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0200)
History: Received April 12, 2012 , Accepted April 30, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, S1573-S1586. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0200)
History: Received April 12, 2012; Accepted April 30, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

PurposeThis study aimed to compare sound production errors arising due to phonological processing impairment with errors arising due to motor speech impairment.

MethodTwo speakers with similar clinical profiles who produced similar consonant cluster simplification errors were examined using a repetition task. We compared both overall accuracy and acoustic details of hundreds of productions with target consonant clusters to tokens with singletons. Changes in accuracy over the course of the study were also compared.

ResultsIn target words with consonant cluster simplification, the individual whose errors reflected phonological impairment produced articulatory timing consistent with singleton onsets. These productions improved when resyllabification was possible, but error rates were not affected by exposure. In contrast, the individual with motoric-based errors produced simplifications that contained the articulatory timing associated with clusters. Accuracy was not affected by the ability to resyllabify, but it did significantly improve following repeated production.

ConclusionsOur findings reveal clear differences between errors arising in phonological processing and in motor planning that reflect the underlying systems. The changes over the course of the study suggest that error types with different sources are responsive to different intervention strategies.

Acknowledgments
The present investigation was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant DC006242. Portions of this work were presented at the 47th annual meeting of the Academy of Aphasia in Boston (2009) and at the 6th International Conference on Speech Motor Control in Groningen, the Netherlands (June 2011). Cristina Sanchez, Jennifer O’Shea, Cettina Chiarelli, Lauren Keenan, Colleen Herlihy, and Tori Miner contributed to testing and acoustic analyses. We thank DLE and HFL for their participation in the study.
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