The Diagnosis and Understanding of Apraxia of Speech: Why Including Neurodegenerative Etiologies May Be Important PurposeTo discuss apraxia of speech (AOS) as it occurs in neurodegenerative disease (progressive AOS [PAOS]) and how its careful study may contribute to general concepts of AOS and help refine its diagnostic criteria.MethodThe article summarizes our current understanding of the clinical features and neuroanatomical and pathologic correlates of PAOS and ... Supplement: Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies
Supplement: Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies  |   October 01, 2012
The Diagnosis and Understanding of Apraxia of Speech: Why Including Neurodegenerative Etiologies May Be Important
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph R. Duffy
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
  • Keith A. Josephs
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
  • Correspondence to Joseph R. Duffy: jduffy@mayo.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler
    Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Special Populations / Speech
Supplement: Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies   |   October 01, 2012
The Diagnosis and Understanding of Apraxia of Speech: Why Including Neurodegenerative Etiologies May Be Important
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, S1518-S1522. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0309)
History: Received January 25, 2012 , Accepted February 24, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, S1518-S1522. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0309)
History: Received January 25, 2012; Accepted February 24, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

PurposeTo discuss apraxia of speech (AOS) as it occurs in neurodegenerative disease (progressive AOS [PAOS]) and how its careful study may contribute to general concepts of AOS and help refine its diagnostic criteria.

MethodThe article summarizes our current understanding of the clinical features and neuroanatomical and pathologic correlates of PAOS and its relationship to primary progressive aphasia (PPA). It addresses similarities and differences between PAOS and stroke-induced AOS that may be relevant to improving our understanding of AOS in general.

ConclusionsPAOS is clinical disorder that should be distinguished from PPA. Its recognition is important to clinical care provided by speech-language pathologists, but it also has implications for neurologic localization and diagnosis as well as prediction of underlying pathology and histochemistry. The clinical features of PAOS and stroke-induced AOS have not been explicitly compared, but they may not be identical because PAOS does not follow a vascular distribution, the brunt of cortical pathology is in the premotor and supplementary motor area, and its onset (rather than acute) is slowly progressive with potential for adaptation to gradual impairment. Careful description and study of PAOS may be a valuable source of information for refining our understanding of AOS in general.

Acknowledgment
This article originated from a presentation given at the “Apraxia of Speech: Mechanisms and Symptoms” satellite workshop during the 6th International Conference on Speech Motor Control in Groningen, the Netherlands, June 2011. This article was supported, in part, by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC010367.
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