Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies PurposeThis article was written as an editorial to a collection of original articles on apraxia of speech (AOS) in which some of the more recent advancements in the understanding of this syndrome are discussed. It covers controversial issues concerning the theoretical foundations of AOS. Our approach was motivated by a ... Supplement: Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies
Supplement: Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies  |   October 01, 2012
Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Wolfram Ziegler
    Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group (EKN), Clinic for Neuropsychology, City Hospital München, Germany
  • Ingrid Aichert
    Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group (EKN), Clinic for Neuropsychology, City Hospital München, Germany
  • Anja Staiger
    Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group (EKN), Clinic for Neuropsychology, City Hospital München, Germany
  • Correspondence to Wolfram Ziegler: wolfram.ziegler@extern.lrz-muenchen.de
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Supplement: Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies   |   October 01, 2012
Apraxia of Speech: Concepts and Controversies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, S1485-S1501. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0128)
History: Received April 18, 2012 , Accepted May 21, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, S1485-S1501. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0128)
History: Received April 18, 2012; Accepted May 21, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 23

PurposeThis article was written as an editorial to a collection of original articles on apraxia of speech (AOS) in which some of the more recent advancements in the understanding of this syndrome are discussed. It covers controversial issues concerning the theoretical foundations of AOS. Our approach was motivated by a change of perspective on motor speech that has taken place in neurobiology, neurolinguistics, phonology, and phonetics during the past few decades.

MethodThe literature on AOS is reviewed from 3 different but overlapping perspectives—that is, a disconnection, a motor memory, and a fine motor skill perspective. Separate sections are devoted to the delimitations of AOS from oral facial apraxia, dysarthria, and phonological impairment.

ConclusionsWe conclude that many of the still unresolved conceptual issues about AOS arise from an underspecification of existing models of spoken language production. We suggest that phonological and motor impairments of sound production should be studied by an integrated approach.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by German Research Council (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft [DFG]) Grants ZI 469/9-1, 10-3, and 14-1 and by ReHa-Hilfe e.V.
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